TreeEbb
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Visit our 450-hectare nurseries with multi-stem trees, climbing trees, trees for avenues and parks characteristic trees and solitary shrubs. And see our 1,400 m² roof gardens with a wide variety of multi-stem fruit trees.
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Know-how to grow
Know-how to grow
For us, know-how to grow means that we look and think beyond simple cultivation and supply of trees. With a team of highly trained and skilled employees, we are happy to advise you on choice of species and assist with development of the plan to make your green project a success. Our planting advisors Discover our know-how to grow
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Planting styles and range

Planting styles and range

How landscapes, parks and gardens have been designed over time reflects how people related to nature. In some landscaping styles we can see the eternal battle between humans and nature whilst in others there is a quest for harmony. Each landscaping style brings its own type of planting: colourful flowers, natural shapes or neat and geometric.

Rolling landscapes, winding paths, large water features, spread out groups of trees and stately avenues characterise the English landscape style. The vastness of the landscape is highlighted by large lawns, where the trees and shrubs are placed strategically and 'exhibited'. The planting is not exuberant in terms of blossom or fruit, it's all about the habit and leaf colour.

Baroque style

Baroque style

Trees: Acer, Carpinus, Castanea, Quercus, Sorbus, Tilia, Ulmus

Hedges: Buxus, Ilex, Carpinus, Prunus laurocerasus, Taxus

Perennials: including Salvia, Verbena

In the Baroque style we see neat, geometric and symmetrical designs, on either side of a central axis. Depth is suggested through views and distorted perspective. Everything comes down to symmetry, even the planting. Lines of trees are trimmed to shape and supplemented with geometric topiary and berceaus. Plant beds are lined with boxwood hedges and perennials cannot be higher than 60 cm. The colours are very sober, mainly green, grey and white.

Renaissance stylel

Renaissance stylel

Trees: Acer, Citrus, Cupressus, Juglans, Liquidambar, Malus, Platanus

Hedges: Buxus, Carpinus, Cornus, Fagus, Ligustrum, Prunus laurocerasus, Rhamnus, Taxus

Perennials: Iris, Lavandula, Myosotis, Nigella, Primula, Tulipa, Viola

The Renaissance style is characterised by straight lines and simple geometric shapes to create tranquillity and simplicity. With a border of hedges, the outdoor space is separated into 'rooms' with lawns or flowerbeds. Sometimes one after the other, with plant arches forming windows, but also often next to each other and in different sizes. The centre point of the design is a sculpted fountain. The planting is subdued. No variegated cultivars when it comes to trees, hedges and shrubs. Finer types of flower are chosen.

Victorian style

Victorian style

Trees: Acer, Fagus, Quercus

Conifers: Chamaecyparis, Juniperus, Taxus, Thuja

Shrubs: Azalea, Cotinus, Prunus, RhododendronRhus, Viburnum, Wisteria

Perennials: including Astilbe, Brunnera, Canna, Fuchsia, Geranium, Gunnera, Hosta

During the era of the Industrial Revolution, many exotic species were brought back from trips to Asia and Africa. The greenhouse was introduced and people experimented with the placement of plants and shrubs in gardens and landscapes. Lush shade plants became popular, along with large flowerbeds full of flowering perennials. Landscape designs in the Victorian style are playful. The planting is colourful, richly flowering and includes a great variety of leaf colours. Conifers were used to create a peaceful backdrop for these colourful compositions.

Cottage style

Cottage style

Trees: Malus, Mespilus, Prunus, Pyrus

Shrubs: Buddleja, Buxus, Crataegus, Rosa

Perennials: Campanula, Helenium, Lavatera, Lupine, Phlox

The cottage style is romantic with an abundance of colours and flowers. It originated from poverty, at a time when all food had to be sourced from people's own gardens. As nobody wanted to show this, a sea of brightly coloured flowers was planted between the fruits and vegetables. Growers took advantage of this and crossed lots of the main species to create unusual varieties. The cottage style is characterised by a design featuring separate spaces with different themes, crossed by narrow paths.

Medieval style

Medieval style

Trees: Corylus, Cydonia, Ficus, Juglans, Malus, Morus, Prunus, Pyrus

Shrubs: Buxus, Rosa, Taxus

Perennials: Anethum, Lavandula, Nymphae, Ocimum, Origanum, Papaver, Ruta, Salvia

The design in medieval-style gardens is characterised by a division into four areas, separated by paths. At the crossroads between the paths is an interesting tree, fountain or pond. The space is walled and the planting consists exclusively of fruit trees, edible flowers and herbs, intended for use in cooking and to make medicines. Outside the walls, shade trees are planted in plant beds with flowering perennials and shrubs.

Chinese style

Chinese style

Trees: Aralia, Betula, Crataegus, Liquidambar, Rhus

Shrubs: Acer palmatum, Deutzia, Ilex crenata, Kerria, low-growing Salix, Rosa

Perennials: Chrysant, Iris, Primula, Rosa

Ground-cover plants: Sagina, Thymus

The Chinese style is characterised by a flowing design with natural materials. Yin and yang are in balance, which means that male components such as rocks and female components such as water are both present and equal. Fragrant, blossoming trees and shrubs bring depth to the garden and camouflage less decorative parts. Trees and plants with small leaves and a fine structure are the most important elements. The colours are subtle, mainly green and grey with pale shades here and there on single flowers.

Japanese style

Japanese style

Trees: Acer, Betula, Ginkgo, Pinus, Sorbus

Shrubs: Acer palmatum, Azalea

Perennials: Used sparingly except in water: Iris kaempferi, Iris siberica

Bamboo: Fargesia, Phyllostachys, Pseudosasa

The Japanese style is based around awe of nature. Natural elements from the environment are literally brought into the design, to create a stylised landscape. The experience of the seasons is very important, as is the harmony between the different components, each of which has a profound symbolic meaning. The perspective is determined by the trees, which are bound and pruned with great precision to create the desired appearance. Trees, shrubs and plants with small, beautifully formed leaves form the basis.

Moorish style

Moorish style

Trees: Citrus, Cupressus, Gleditsia, Malus, Prunus dulcis, Quercus, Sorbus, Taxus

Shrubs: Buxus, Rosa

Perennials: Antirrhinum, Centaurea, Erica, Gamander

Bulbs: Narcissus ssp., Scilla

Climbing plants: Clematis, Hedera, Lonicera, Rosa

The Moorish style is characterised by geometric shapes. There is a clear division into four quadrants, created by paths and/or water courses, meeting in a large, central water feature. Trees with sparse crowns are placed at the edges and trees with columnar crowns bringing perspective to the design. The other planting consists of a harmony of fragrant, blossoming perennials and annuals in plant beds surrounded by hedges.

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